Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Exotic Pet Info

Diet/Housing

Home
Shelter Directory
All Creatures Care
Resources
My Pictures
Pet Pictures Sent in
Raccoons
Skunks
Sugar Gliders
Fennec Foxes
Opossoms
Flying Squirrels
Prairie Dogs
Kinkajous
Big Cats
Coatimundis
Hedgehogs

Diet-
 
Although Southern flying squirrels are semi-carnivorous in the wild--enjoying bugs, grubs, larvae, berries and acorns-- a good feeding program for captive squirrels consists primarily of nuts and sweet fruit. A good menu would consist of an ample supply of peanuts with a treat of pecan halves, walnut pieces and a wedge of apple and orange each night. Fresh fruit keeps the squirrel's digestive system working smoothly. Some squirrels fed a diet of only nuts have shown a tendency toward constipation. Uneaten fruit should be removed daily.
 
 
Housing-
 
: Since Southern flying squirrel are not large they can make do with a fairly small cage, but to thrive they need room to run and climb. Vertical space is more important than floor space though, so a tall cage is best. A cage designed for sugar gliders can work well, as long as the spacing in the mesh is narrow (1/2 inch by 1 inch at most). Some owners find that a homemade cage works well too (see this page for a sample homemade cage). Keep in mind that Southern flying squirrels are excellent chewers, so make sure they cannot chew Housing: Since Southern flying squirrel are not large they can make do with a fairly small cage, but to thrive they need room to run and climb. Vertical space is more important than floor space though, so a tall cage is best. A cage designed for sugar gliders can work well, as long as the spacing in the mesh is narrow (1/2 inch by 1 inch at most). Some owners find that a homemade cage works well too (see this page for a sample homemade cage). Keep in mind that Southern flying squirrels are excellent chewers, so make sure they cannot chew their way out of their cage (any wood or plastic should be covered with wire). Floor space of 2 feet by 2 feet is adequate, but the taller the cage, the better.
Provide branches in the cage, for both climbing and chewing. Cotton ropes hung in the cage also provide opportunity for climbing and play. Nest boxes should be provided along with facial tissues, paper towel, or cotton for nesting material (avoid anything with threads that could wrap around and damage a leg). The bottom of the cage can be lined with bedding or litter appropriate for rodents (i.e. no cedar shavings - see Top Alternatives to Cedar Shavings for advice).
their way out of their cage (any wood or plastic should be covered with wire). Floor space of 2 feet by 2 feet is adequate, but the taller the cage, the better.

This page was created on 08/27/04